An introduction to the history of native americans in north america

Guisepi This is the story of how the American Republic developed from colonial beginnings in the 16th century, when the first European explorers arrived, until modern times. At the same time, the population and the economy of the United States grew and changed dramatically. The population diversified as immigrants arrived from all countries of the world.

An introduction to the history of native americans in north america

Edit Pre-Columbian Further information: Settlement of the Americas, Paleo-Indians, and Pre-Columbian era map showing the approximate location of the ice-free corridor and specific Paleoindian sites Clovis theory.

ADDITIONAL MEDIA

According to the still-debated Settlement of the Americas, a migration of humans from Eurasia to the Americas took place via Beringia, a land bridge which formerly connected the two continents across what is now the Bering Strait.

The big-game hunting culture labeled as the Clovis culture is primarily identified with its production of fluted projectile points. The culture received its name from artifacts found near Clovis, New Mexico; the first evidence of this tool complex was excavated in The culture is identified by the distinctive Clovis point, a flaked flint spear-point with a notched flute, by which it was inserted into a shaft.

Dating of Clovis materials has been in association with animal bones and by the use of carbon dating methods. Recent reexaminations of Clovis materials using improved carbon-dating methods produced results of 11, and 10, radiocarbon years B. Contemporary Native Americans today have a unique relationship with the United States because they may be members of nations, tribes, or bands of Native Americans who have sovereignty or independence from the government of the United States.

Their societies and cultures flourish within a larger population of descendants of immigrants both voluntary and slave: African, Asian, Middle Eastern, and European peoples. Native Americans who were not already U. Numerous Paleoindian cultures occupied North America, with some restricted to the Great Plains and Great Lakes of the modern United States of America and Canada, as well as adjacent areas to the west and southwest.

According to the oral histories of many of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, they have been living there since their genesis, described by a wide range of traditional creation accounts.

Linguists, anthropologists, and archeologists believe their ancestors comprised a separate migration into North America, later than the first Paleo-Indians. They settled first around present-day Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, from where they migrated into Alaska and northern Canada, south along the Pacific Coast, and into the interior.

They were the earliest ancestors of the Athabascan- speaking peoples, including the present-day and historical Navajo and Apache. Their villages were constructed with large multi-family dwellings, used seasonally.

People did not live there year round, but for the summer to hunt and fish, and to gather food supplies for the winter. Poverty Point culture is an archaeological culture whose people inhabited the area of the lower Mississippi Valley and surrounding Gulf Coast. The term "Woodland" was coined in the s and refers to prehistoric sites dated between the Archaic period and the Mississippian cultures.

The Arctic

The Hopewell tradition is the term used to describe common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States from BC to CE. The Hopewell tradition was not a single culture or society, but a widely dispersed set of related populations, who were connected by a common network of trade routes,[25] known as the Hopewell Exchange System.

An introduction to the history of native americans in north america

At its greatest extent, the Hopewell exchange system ran from the Southeastern United States into the southeastern Canadian shores of Lake Ontario. Within this area, societies participated in a high degree of exchange with the highest amount of activity along the waterways serving as their major transportation routes.

The Hopewell exchange system traded materials from all over the United States. Coles Creek culture is an archaeological culture from the Lower Mississippi Valley in the southern present-day United States.This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American .

Jan 18,  · Photo illustration by Lisa Larson-Walker. Photos via Library of Congress & Wikimedia Commons. Here are three scenes from the history of slavery in North America.

In , a group of Pequot Indians. Approximately 12,–15, years ago people from northeast Asia crossed the Bering Land Bridge to enter and inhabit North America beginning in Alaska but rapidly spreading throughout North and South American and the Caribbean islands. This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with .

The history of Native Americans in the United States began in ancient times tens of thousands of years ago with the settlement of the Americas by the srmvision.compologists and archeologists have identified and studied a wide variety of cultures that existed during this era.

Their subsequent contact with Europeans had a profound impact on their history . History Pockets-Native Americans, Grades 13, contains nine memorable discovery pockets.

An introduction to the history of native americans in north america

The introduction pocket gives an overview of the tribes in North America that are featured.

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